Composting

The weather has been nice this weekend, and I decided to start a compost pile for this spring. It’s 57 right now.

The Creator of the Universe was kind enough to pile the leaves against a neighbors fence, and I took advantage of that. Thank you, Creator, whoever you are.

I used some 2′ chicken wire fencing I had, and some cheap fence posts I had for a few years now, and built an area about 3’x6′, give or take a foot.

One thing that helps is to mulch the leaves before adding them to the pile. To do this, I raked them and piled them into a trash can, then took a small battery powered weed eater, and mulched them inside the can. This really cuts down on the volume so more leaves can be added to the trash can and mulched.

Then, I dumped them into the pile, and mulched them some more. It’s reasonable to see how this will speed up the composting process.

I added some coffee grounds, and some potting mix I used last year to grow potatoes in containers. To this, I will add diluted urine to add nitrogen. This will help the composting process. Then I half-assed mixing this all together.

There is still plenty of leaves and potting mix to add, and I will, as the pile settles. Of course vegetable table scraps will be added as well. Just don’t add meat or dairy products.

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Posted on February 8, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Don’t forget grass clippings. That’s what I use for mulch, mixed with some Preen. I find one, good, thick layer of grass clippings will last the entire growing season. The following spring it gets tilled into the soil.

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    • I’ll use grass. In fact you reminded me of this, where he shows how to get compost out of grass in about 2 weeks. I think he might be wrong on why it works, but he shows it works. He uses beer as an ingredient and claims the yeast helps, but I don’t think beer has any living yeast in it

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  2. Brewing temperature kills the yeast, so I’m guessing it’s the carbs that have been broken down by the yeast. More easily digestible for microorganisms. At least that’s where the science I learned in culinary school takes me.

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